Norfolk Self-Catering Accommodation to Rent in Watton

Huge skies, gentle waterways and a slower, rural pace can be enjoyed on self-catering holidays in Watton. This bustling market town lies in the beautiful Breckland district of Norfolk, 15 miles west of the city of Norwich. From your holiday cottage in Watton, the historic town centre will be a stroll away with a lovely selection of independent shops, cafes, restaurants and pubs. The Willow House, Old Bell and Wagon and Horses are all cosy, old pubs where you can savour a pint of local ale or good meal. An excellent market is held every Wednesday, from 9am until 1pm, with a number of fishmongers selling the highest-quality seafood fresh from the North Sea. Don’t miss the Dragonfly Gallery, where paintings by local artists are exhibited. On the outskirts of Watton, Wayland Woods is the setting for the Old English ballad, Babes in the Wood, and is now a lovely nature reserve which is home to a number of rare bird species.

1 cottages found. 1 matches all criteria.

A stunning Grade II listed Regency House, Clermont Hall in Norfolk was once owned by the Duke of Wellington and now offers luxury self-catering accommodation for 36 guests in 18 bedrooms. It includes an outdoor heated swimming pool, games room, snooker room, sauna and hot tub and extensive grounds

  • Sleeps 36
  • Bedrooms 18
  • Bathrooms 12

As you wander through the narrow streets in the heart of Watton, you’ll notice a number of graceful historic landmarks, including a clock tower, which was built in 1679 and stands next to the tourist information centre. Take the time to find medieval St Mary’s Church, said to be the town’s oldest building, tucked away on a quiet side street. Watton hosts one of Norfolk’s oldest annual events, the Wayland Show, which takes place on the first Sunday of August, with falconry, horse and carriage rides and displays of livestock and classic tractors. The countryside around Watton is a paradise for walking. Just outside the town, the Pingo Trail weaves through marshy woods and wetland, before ending on a disused railway, by Thompson Water. Look out for the famous Pingo Ponds – or Kettle Ponds – which were formed by Ice Age glaciers.